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As many of you know, one of my favorite recipes ever is our No Cook Edible Slime.  It still is, but in several places worldwide it's challenging to find one of the main ingredients in that recipe - basil seeds.  I'm so excited to finally have a solution for you all!  My awesome blogging friend Dyan of And Next Comes L was working on trying to make our chia seed recipe work out (initially I'd tried the same approach as I did with the basil seeds, but the chia seeds lose water as you play, so the slime would fall apart over time) and we were chatting when I had a realization!  I'd been studying a lot of specialty ingredients for the series of gluten-free play recipes I created for our book - and I thought of something that just might fix the problems I was having with the chia seeds.  We tried it out and it works PERFECTLY:

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

The chia seed slime doesn't fall apart as you play and it's really fun and super stretchy!

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

 You can move it as one big glob.

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

You can make hand or footprints in it.

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

It's so fun to watch it ribbon down from up high!

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

And since it's edible (though please don't serve this to your child as a meal, haha), it's safe for very little ones to explore as well!

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

We got ours to stretch around 5 feet, which is amazing for an edible, chemical-free slime!

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids
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From there, I wondered if I could modify the same basic recipe to make flax seeds work (I could) and then I wanted to see if I could make it work with no seeds at all (I could!).  Though the other two recipes worked, we all felt the best version of the slime was the chia seeds.  It was the most flexible and stretchy, so if you can get ahold of chia seeds, that's our recommendation.  And to save money, we buy our seeds and our xanthan gum in the bulk section of our grocery store.  Here are all three recipes.

To make Edible Chia Seed Slime:

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Chia Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

Measure 1/4 cup chia seeds and 2 cups of water into a sealable container (we use tupperware containers) and store overnight in the fridge (12-24 hours).  If you can, stir at least once because the seeds tend to clump.  The next day your seeds should be nice and gelatinous.  Stir to break up any clumps, then add 1 teaspoon of xanthan gum and whisk.  It won't completely mix in, but that's OK.   Add food coloring if you'd like, though as you can see from the photos above, you don't want to add a whole bottle of blue to make a really cool blue color.  It will just give your family smurf hands.  Add 3-5 drops and call it good and your hands will thank you. Next add one full 16 oz box of cornstarch (for UK folks this is cornflour) and mix.  At some point, it gets easier to knead by hand.  After that continue adding cornstarch by the Tablespoon until the slime isn't sticky.  We found that we needed to add 5 additional Tablespoons of cornstarch.  You will know your slime is ready when you can move it as a big heap.  If it's crumbly and not stretchy, add a teaspoon of water to correct and knead well.

We played with it for over an hour each time and it didn't dry out, but if it does, just wet your hands under the sink and knead them into the slime - this should be enough water to rehydrate it.

It is edible, which means it is perishable.  It will need to be stored in the refrigerator in a sealed container when not in use.  It can keep for up to a week, but please inspect it for signs of mold or foul odor before presenting it to your child for play each time.  An interesting difference between this recipe and our Basil Seed Slime is that this recipe will harden in the refrigerator each time you store it.  To rehydrate it and get it ready for play, using your hands or a spoon, break it into small chunks and pour 1 Tablespoon of water over it at a time.  Knead the water in until your slime reaches its normal consistency.  It typically takes around 3 Tablespoons of water, but it will vary based on how many hours it has been in the fridge, etc.

  To make Edible Flax Seed Slime:

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime using Flax Seeds!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

Measure 1/2 cup flax seeds and 2 cups of water into a sealable container (we use tupperware containers) and store overnight in the fridge (12-24 hours).  The next day your seeds should be nice and gelatinous.  Stir to break up any clumps, then add 2 teaspoons of xanthan gum and whisk.  It won't completely mix in, but that's OK.   Add food coloring if you'd like (3-5 drops is enough in our experience).  Next add one full 16 oz box of cornstarch + 1/4 cup (for UK folks this is cornflour) and mix.  At some point, it gets easier to knead by hand.  If the slime is still very sticky, add more cornstarch 1 Tablespoon at a time and knead between each addition.  If the slime is crumbly and not stretchy, add a teaspoon of water to correct and knead well.

We played with it for over an hour each time and it didn't dry out, but if it does, just wet your hands under the sink and knead them into the slime - this should be enough water to rehydrate it.

It is edible, which means it is perishable.  It will need to be stored in the refrigerator in a sealed container when not in use.  It can keep for up to a week, but please inspect it for signs of mold or foul odor before presenting it to your child for play each time.  An interesting difference between this recipe and our Basil Seed Slime is that this recipe will harden in the refrigerator each time you store it.  To rehydrate it and get it ready for play, using your hands or a spoon, break it into small chunks and pour 1 Tablespoon of water over it at a time.  Knead the water in until your slime reaches its normal consistency.  It typically takes around 3 Tablespoons of water, but it will vary based on how many hours it has been in the fridge, etc.

To make Edible Seedless Slime:

Without the additional stabilization from the seeds and their gelatin, this slime is less stretchy and more prone to snapping than the above two.  However, if you don't have access to basil, chia, or flax seeds, it's still a very fun slime to play with!

A NEW recipe for No-Cook Edible (Taste-Safe) Slime!  A super fun slime for ALL ages!  From Fun at Home with Kids

Add 1 and 3/4 cups of water to 1 Tablespoon of xanthan gum and whisk.  The xanthan gum won't completely mix in, but that's OK.   Add food coloring if you'd like (3-5 drops is enough in our experience).  Next add one full 16 oz box of cornstarch + 1/2 cup (for UK folks this is cornflour) and mix.  At some point, it gets easier to knead by hand.  If the slime is still very sticky, add more cornstarch 1 Tablespoon at a time and knead between each addition.  If the slime is crumbly and not stretchy, add a teaspoon of water to correct and knead well.

We played with it for over an hour each time and it didn't dry out, but if it does, just wet your hands under the sink and knead them into the slime - this should be enough water to rehydrate it.

It is edible, which means it is perishable.  It will need to be stored in the refrigerator in a sealed container when not in use.  It can keep for up to a week, but please inspect it for signs of mold or foul odor before presenting it to your child for play each time.  An interesting difference between this recipe and our Basil Seed Slime is that this recipe will harden in the refrigerator each time you store it.  To rehydrate it and get it ready for play, using your hands or a spoon, break it into small chunks and pour 1 Tablespoon of water over it at a time.  Knead the water in until your slime reaches its normal consistency.  It typically takes around 3 Tablespoons of water, but it will vary based on how many hours it has been in the fridge, etc.


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All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child's parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child's pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Comments

  1. that looks like something my daughter would LOVE to do! Glad I found your blog via bloglovin today! :) Excited to be following along!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much!! I am a preschool teacher and love sensory play but have never liked the idea of the kiddos playing with borax! Thanks again!:)

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    2. Awesome! They used the recipe at my daughter's preschool and the kids had a blast. Hope your kiddos love it as well! :) :) :)

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  2. do you think i could do the seedless recipe but just add some plain gelatine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In addition to the Xanthan Gum? Could be interesting - haven't tried it. If you're talking instead of Xanthan Gum, I did try that and couldn't make it work since gelatin breaks down as you play with it.... But that's not to say its impossible. I just don't know how to. :)

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  3. Where to I purchase xanthan gum?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Online, at specialty stores (especially ones with lots of gluten-free items), or in the bulk section of a store with lots of baking supplies. Hope that helps! :)

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  4. How many boxes of Corn flour would I need to make the seedless slime as I live in the UK. I get confused between oz and grams as I know that corn flour comes in gram boxes not oz.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A 16oz box of Cornstarch should equal a 454 gram box of corn flour. :) Hope that helps!

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  5. Would ground flax seed work in this please?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never checked! If you'd like to try, I'd add some water to a little bit of it and put it in the fridge overnight. If it's created a thick gel, then it should work! Hope that helps.

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  6. Can I subsidies glucomannan for the xanthan gum?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried it, but it looks like you can use it as a straight substitution in baking, so I suspect it will work!

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  7. Hi! Can I use potato starch instead of corn starch?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried it, but you should be able to. Just keep in mind that you may need to add slightly more or less than the recipe calls for. :)

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  8. How much does 1 batch make?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The amount you see in the photos is one batch. :)

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  9. Have you tried adding salt to lengthen the shelf life?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No because the seeds wouldn't absorb water correctly. I don't know if you could compensate with cornstarch - it might be possible?

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  10. hi
    i dont get the xinthan gum where i stay
    can you pls suggest me a substitute?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know of any other substitutes. Where do you live? I can try to help you find xanthan gum. :)

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  11. Does the edible slimes stain and leave little particles on the hands like in some of the pictures?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great question! We had no staining with the green, though I know blue food colorings can be a bit more intense. If you are worried about staining, I would either go colorless or do the green like we do. And yes, small bits are left behind, but they are super easy to clean up and crumble once they're dry. Hope that helps! :)

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  12. can i add cream of tartar and salt as preservative?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You could try with the seedless. The salt will disrupt the seeds from gelling though in the seed slimes, so I don't think it would work there. It'd have to be a fair amount of salt because cornstarch molds very easily.... :/

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  13. I made the chia seed one, but it was a bit different than yours in the photo. It doesn't stretch that much and if I add a bit of water, it becomes auper sticky and not much pliable. A bit more starch and it's crumbly or snap when you stretch it further. We still had lots of fun playing and discovering. Thank you for the recipe ☺

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm, it sounds like something went wrong. Can you send me photos of the ingredients you used? Did you store the chia seeds for 24 hours in the fridge before you started? You can email me at funathomewithkids@gmail.com

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